Vacate the premises

Farewell, Brindavoine: early Jacques Tardi from 1972 but peering at it looking for unrefined skill is wasted effort. A fully formed cartoonist is at work, World War I already installed at the centre of Tardi’s art to darken Brindavoines slapstick chase into It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Bloodbath. In the middle interlude the author turns up, complaining bitterly about the inability of storytellers to have any beneficial influence on the world and drawn like Dr. Phibes’s decaying cousin; a fairly abyssal spark of pessimism from an expert at putting nuance into that particular emotion.


I didn’t put this year’s reprint of Farewell, Brindavoine on my list for The Comics Journal ’s huge behemoth two-dozen-contributor round-up of recommended 2021 comics, but these were on there:

What is Britain - Simon MoretonWhat is Britain - Simon Moreton

Zig Zag - Will SweeneyZig Zag - Will Sweeney

Laab #2 - Ronald Wimberly et alLaab #2 - Ronald Wimberly et al

The Twelve Sisters of the Never-Ending Castle - Shintaro KagoThe Twelve Sisters of the Never-Ending Castle - Shintaro Kago

Monsters - Barry Windsor-SmithMonsters - Barry Windsor-Smith

The Grande Odalisque - Ruppert et Mulot et VivèsThe Grande Odalisque - Ruppert et Mulot et Vivès

Mysterious Travelers - Zack KruseMysterious Travelers - Zack Kruse

Son of Tomahawk - Matt SenecaSon of Tomahawk - Matt Seneca

Most of these are either solid radical comics or about the life of the mind, which might amount to roughly similar things these days even if they don’t take the same road.

The exposure of social ills or injustice, the satirizing or demystification of institutions and leaders, the recording of conflict or disturbance, the exhortation to radical violence or non-violent revolution.

as said by Amos Vogel in Film As A Subversive Art, now handily just republished so there’s a book you can wave at anyone who asks what everyone used to agree upon. Not everyone does agree any more, but at some point talking about anything other than the basics isn’t really talking at all.

See also: On Monsters and Third Reich vibes
On Will Sweeney’s previous Grok for TCJ
A bit more on Sweeney’s new Zig Zag.
And also: Robert Hughes on identity politics doing nothing for art.

3 January 2022 Art

A feud with Jimmy Page and Kenneth Anger


Alan Moore and Tom Burke: Show peopleAlan Moore and Tom Burke: Show people

My votes in the year’s Sight & Sound best films poll were for:

This year’s votes were requested even earlier than last year’s and the film at number one isn’t released until February 2022 before we even start talking about its rigid conservatism…but no point rehashing all of that again. Anyway my real answer is probably Titane.

Double-take of the year from Tom Burke in The Show, reacting to the sight of Alan Moore’s spectral mystic Moon-Man in the back garden by going full boggle.

Single-take of the century from the elderly lady in Radu Jude’s Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn who just wanders into shot and says Eat My Cnut without it being clear if she’s in the film or of the film or just a big fan of Radu Jude.

There might seem to be a lot of space between The Show and Bad Luck Banging and between Alan Moore and Radu Jude, although both of them are humanists who can’t quite lose faith with humanity no matter how crummy its individual specimens behave. Both films are deeply rooted in their own locations too, lungfuls of dust from Northampton and Bucharest evidently inhaled. The Show is miles out of step with current British film tendencies—fans of The Souvenir Part II will have to watch it with their eyes clamped open like Malcolm McDowell—and Bad Luck Bangings initial flirt with ground-level naturalism in the age of Covid (including Mrs Cnut there, not to mention five minutes of hardcore porn) is only temporary since it becomes as mannered and calculated as a stage performance. The films hardly overlap at all, apart from both having something to say about the state of what you might in the circumstances call the Soft Left and saying it via the language of panto—which is to say they actually overlap.

An issue of that Chicago Film Society zine mentioned this time last year as a rare sighting of something that would be less rare if we were in a healthier position duly arrived at my door, its authenticity confirmed by a trip from Chicago via rowing boat taking 11 weeks. Infuriating Times #3 is sympatico and authentico, 48 pages of stapled scratchy mono noodling with something jammed into every bit of white space and some of the illustration line work bleached out to illegibility. It has several opaque projection-booth asides and obligatory not-funny funny bits, but also a 15-page article about late-2000s decline of film at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that I’m safely assuming you wouldn’t find anywhere else, cultural journalism naming a certain number of names in an unsigned essay presumably stewing for twelve years. The fact that Infuriating Times is in theory not the product of film critics at all but actual cinema staff, people affected by The Current War through the loss of employment rather than the loss of opportunities to swan around wearing a lanyard, and that it duly appeared not as something pretty on the Kindle Store but as scrap paper wrapped round the metaphorical brick, speaks for itself. This, as the old saying goes, is what they want.

3 December 2021 Films

Flaming youth

Not Foundation Year: the way they wereNot Foundation Year: the way they were

In the December Sight & Sound magazine some words about Foundation Year, a micro-budget college romance willed into existence by the enthusiasm of its makers and formerly known as Shithouse, potentially remaining so for at least one viewer. The days when Animal House could make a point about society via bozos in some historic Zeta Zeta Zeta fraternity are already a long way back, but for a current film to earnestly say that the college-age young have skin barely one atom thick seems like a newsflash from another century now that the generation in question is trying to take control of a world both sinking and on fire.


Elsewhere:

Dune: destiny’s child’s motherDune: destiny’s child’s mother

The new film of Dune has a young man with self-confident hair deciding to depose the sitting Emperor of the Known Universe, which sounds nearer the mark.

Denis Villeneuve makes Christopher Nolan look like one of The Merry Pranksters, but since serious science-fiction is a rare cinema species there’s a limit to how much griping is appropriate when someone goes and makes some. Whether Dune actually is hardcore art, or just foundational bits of fantasy business inflated with a very dense gas, is another question. Pondering what originality even looks like in an era of massive cultural surplus is enough to blow a fuse, but you can look at Dunes sights and sounds, detect their impact and voltage in the moment, and still laugh darkly at the arrival of the latest film full of foam.

Villeneuve’s embrace of sci-fi—three films in a row depending how you classify Arrival—was precisely zero surprise once it became clear that he’s a member of the Architects Film Club (prop: Joseph Kosinski who put Tom Cruise and Andrea Riseborough on top of a two-mile pole in Oblivion). The built environment gets his juices going: Enemy is about a lot of things but paranoia in Mississauga high-rises is certainly one of them, and Sicarios roads and tunnels and toll booths and dead ends are shot more tenderly than half the characters, caressed by aerial drone shots. Back at the source of my Villeneuve viewing, Next Floor looked pretty good in 2008 as a dry joke from the Peter Greenaway school of baked atrocity, but in hindsight the rotten building and its creaking timbers are giving the director a thrill on their own. Of course sci-fi appeals to someone with that kind of interest in architectural vibes and the individuals feeling them.

But you still have to make an actual film in there somewhere. Dune Part One has cavernous brutalist rooms to suit the grandiosity that the story endlessly talks about, chambers of anxiety and history. Then the film swings over towards metaphysics and prophecy and altered states, which do not seem to be Villeneuve’s bag at all. In the interiors he gives the full treatment to the faces of Rebecca Ferguson and Stellan Skarsgård, the former dominating any frame she appears in and the latter taking the opportunity to be Marlon Brando as Colonel Kurtz. Out in the endless desert with its not very individual individuals, the director almost seems to give up, not helped by the self-inflicted stuttering un-climax of Only The Beginning. There’s talk of desert power, but the film is most comfortable with military movie power, ornithopters buzzing like Black Hawks in this particular foreign policy scenario, and evil ships gliding out from behind a mesa like the menacing flyers of Blade Runner 2049, if not Capricorn One.

Whatever the supply chain issues with serious sci-fi, the glut of general mid-table fantasticals all processed through the same post-production software and sloshing around like a cultural wine lake makes the days when sci-fi was supposed to be a headspace and a hacker genre seem as far off as the dinosaurs. Respectability has not done the category much good, judging by what my streaming services keep yelling at me to watch. Dunes message in a bottle from 1965 isn’t entirely reassuring, about decay and rot of all your established orders and the shock of the probably not very fabulous new and karma that removes the choices from your pretty head; but whether that’s intended to fit quite as well as it does with the deadening ozone of digital effects is anyone’s guess.

Villeneuve put chewy ambiguities into Blade Runner 2049, which compared to Dune trips a lively fandango, and for his trouble got some impressively dim reviews that went to great lengths to miss the point. (Me in Sight & Sound discussing the actual point.) Dune takes no chances with that, partly by aligning even more exactly with a current theme: we are also well-supplied with characters realising the truth about their individual selves, rather than about their class or their collective or their coworkers. Leftism suppressed, while individualism moves in. As the film’s funders no doubt spotted, Dunes story has always had an angle on the issues of identity without which half of current pop culture might have to head back to the drawing board. Matrix Resurrections approaches on the horizon, returning to stamping grounds of gnostic awakening and the messianic tendency that are a lot more crowded than they were when Neo first put his trench coat on—crowded with Paul Atreides waiting for his story to complete for starters. Whether or not he gets his Part Two it’s still the season of The Ones.

See also: On the Villeneuve-less Sicario 2 Soldado
And also: What’s a Leftist film anyway, in Sight & Sound
And yet also: Avengers Endgame and the last rites of Stan Lee

5 November 2021 Films

The hitman and her

Kiss kiss kablooeyKiss kiss kablooey

Casino Royale is a great film apart from that interminable stuff at an airport while you’re waiting for Eva Green to show up, although I’m not sure even its fans were asking for the entire James Bond series to operate in that film’s shadow for the next 15 years. I’m not sure that modernising male characters has to be about loading them up with The Strong Man’s Burdens either, but burdened strong men litter the landscape from Mission:Impossible to Rambo Last Blood to Sicario 2, a bulk cultural shorthand for all sorts of things that are more nuanced than the average blockbuster can contain. Bond has spent three whole films suppressing a mournful sigh of regret in every scene, even the ones where he’s relieving some Spectre schmuck of his spleen. In return for this he gets Vesper Lynd’s mausoleum exploding in his face at the start of No Time to Die, simultaneously as absurd a final insult as possible and the only thing left to happen in their relationship.

No Time to Die has been built in the workshop to have something for everyone, or at least everyone acclimatised to the way that the Bond films strike a serious pose and a goofy self-conscious smirk at the same time. So 007’s very serious emotional rescue takes place while ludicrous nanobots dissolve people’s faces and a henchman carries Ernst Stavro Blofeld’s bionic eye around on a plush little cushion like he’s bringing in the Ferrero Rocher. Hans Zimmer does the music and quotes not just John Barry directly but his own Batman Begins music too; compared to the moments of deep jazz brass in Thomas Newman’s last two scores, the music is just a rhythm track. The film’s dialogue is entirely made of polyester, but Daniel Craig spins some of it into gold. I’ve forgotten who the villain is already. M should get the sack. The luxury brand tie-ins roll on as if the world wasn’t sinking beneath the waters, should anyone fancy Moneypenny’s white MKC x 007 Bond Bancroft handbag for £1,350.

And Bond meets a couple of competent female co-workers, one of whom in particular was apparently built to the original blueprint after a few decades of social change and geopolitical shift. He gets on with her so famously that it probably counts as self-love; one look at her and he knows the game is up, nothing left but the weeping string synth patches of the Hans Zimmer keyboard. This and several other things about No Time to Die reviewed for Critic’s Notebook.

See also: Skyfall in which the bad guy plays a John Lee Hooker song for no earthly reason and Spectre in which the master criminal prints out pictures of other characters from the MGM website and sticks them up with Blu Tack.

7 October 2021 Films

Shoutouts

Two from the Edinburgh International Film Festival at Critic’s Notebook:

Mandibles: scream and scream againMandibles: scream and scream again

Mandibles is the deadpan one with the big giant fly and Adèle Exarchopolus shouting at everyone, both of which probably made director Quentin Dupieux chuckle heartily when he wrote them down. Dupieux is on one long Dada trip, and someone always should be so it might as well be him. There’s an article to be written about how this monstrous fly and King Shark and Weasel in The Suicide Squad are a trend, the unbearable strangeness of nature made Acceptably Horrible in some new SFX uncanny valley, environmental collapse with giggles.

Mad God is the one with a universe of senseless mayhem played out by cosmic forces in a parable of capitalist desolation—but funny. Phil Tippett has spent three decades getting this animated film into shape, pausing only to go and earn a crust working for other people as one of the greatest model animators around. Those crusts included directing Starship Troopers 2: Hero of the Federation, a film with puppets onscreen in more senses than one and which at the time looked like just a calamitous insult to Paul Verhoeven. But its retreat from Verhoeven’s sunlight and space and aerial views into cheaper danker darker quarters and insectoid things charging around at ground level in the gloom looks a lot like one thread of Tippett’s preferred puppetry style. Mad God tips its crud-filled combat helmet to several of Tippett’s peers, in the case of Terry Gilliam via a sight gag primed and waiting since 1979.

Mad God: assassin’s crudMad God: assassin’s crud

23 August 2021 Films

Feel the hand of history

At The Comics Journal a review of a new book of critical essays on the subject of Judge Dredd, which can’t really be tackled without a pop at the whole criticism gig-economy grinder out of which the book comes. Marc Singer’s survey of the state of pop-culture analysis name-dropped on here endlessly already is pressed into service once again to say why enthusiastic promotion instead of actual critique might not do readers or writers much good, although in the case of 2000AD there are the business practices and mannerisms of the publisher to weigh up as well. Quite why any marketing department would not push back strenuously against the claim that a publication’s best work was thirty years ago has never been very clear, but in this case it’s the marketing department that keeps repeating it.

All roads lead back to the strip’s past partly because that’s where original writer John Wagner looms on the landscape like a benevolent god. The annual couple of stories that Wagner contributes to Judge Dredd these days consistently make the other writers look like they’re taking a different strip down a different path. Or at least a path less likely to make the comic a snarling grimy banner of action and outrage,” as the publishing staff said in 2019, another PR statement that flew by without any critical analysis of what it might mean.

In timely fashion, the book arrives just as John Wagner concludes a ten-week stint writing Judge Dredd in 2000AD, two stories that prove the point. In one of them Dredd trails the world’s unluckiest hitman, efficiently and without tripping over. But the second is Wagner Ascendant, putting the strip’s own history into motion by twinning the actual plot with an unrelated Mega-City One TV show which keeps chipping in, a Greek chorus with an unlimited SFX budget, broadcasting images like that one up there in a manner which leaves the reader to work out who is speaking to whom. It turns out to be Wagner speaking, and reminding anyone who needs to hear that his co-creation is a society built on corpses.

18 August 2021 Art